Sort Of A Place Like Home


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Sort Of A Place Like Home


First published in 1993, Sort of a Place Like Home is the award-winning study of life within the Moore River Native Settlement. Part of the bold social experiment by the 'Chief Protector of Aborigines' A O Neville, the Western Australian settlement was for thirty years 'sort of a place like home' for thousands of indigenous people.

 
  • Typically vivid and concise... [an] engrossing evocation of this sequestered child world.
    — THE AGE (MELBOURNE)
  • Another Review Here
    — Sussy
  • And another one here!
    — Sussy
  • Winner, Non-Fiction Award
    — Adelaide Festival, 1994

The Mask of Motherhood


The Mask of Motherhood


When a woman becomes a mother, her relationships, her professional identity and her sense of self will never be the same again. The fact is, the presence of children does not simply add to the lives of their parents, it transforms them completely.

 
  • ... seldom have the conundrums of a whole generation of middle-class women been so clearly and so sympathetically expressed. Maushart has written a feminist classic.
    — THE SUNDAY TIMES (LONDON) )
  • A gust of fresh air and an antidote to romantic notions of motherhood. Susan Maushart writes with terrific verve and style.
    — SHEILA KITZINGER, MBE

Wifework


Wifework


Husbands and wives may say they are committed to equality. Yet, whether employed or not, wives still perform an astounding share of the physical, emotional and organisational labour in marriage — everything from housework to ‘sex work’. Wifework is lucid, funny, provocative and inspirational. Every woman will recognise its passionate message — and every man may have to.

 
  • An often funny dissection of modern marriage, it is 100% honest - like the rest of this smart and witty book.
    — PUBLISHERS WEEKLY
  • Maushart's book is funny, fast, angry and just the job to get sparks flying across the table at dinner parties.
    — DAILY MAIL (UK)
  • Maushart delves deep into this continuing phenomenon and looks at how marriage can be made into something more fun and less exhausting for the modern woman. Wifework is an enlightening book that encourages its readers to reassess marriage and what it should entail in today's society. Provocative and inspirational, it's a compelling read.
    — IRISH NEWS )

What Women Want Next


What Women Want Next


What Women Want Next is a guide for the perplexed of both genders. Susan Maushart unsheathes her notorious wit and unerring sense of style on the knotty question of feminine fulfilment in a postfeminist world.

 
  • Maushart offers a breezy style, vivid personal anecdotes and a funny take on female-male relationships.
    — KIRKUS REVIEWS
  • Dark, dirty, dangerous sense of humour.
    — AGE
  • What Women Want Next is all about feeling better about the choices we make and moving on from the bellyaching…Maushart lays out a detailed guide for living well and happily within realistic expectations…A hugely witty woman with the capacity to make you laugh out loud.
    — SUNDAY TELEGRAPH
  • So lively and entertaining as to make even the bleakest predictions about women’s lives seem less depressing.
    — SYDNEY MORNING HERALD
  • Witty, sharp and original, a woman men should listen to…Maushart extends a stylish invitation to listen.
    — AUSTRALIAN
  • Feminism at its page-turning best: engaging with, rather than preaching to, contemporary women.
    — GOOD READING

The Winter Of Our Disconnect


The Winter Of Our Disconnect


The Winter of Our Disconnect challenges readers to examine the toll that technology is taking on their own family connections, and to create a media ecology that instead encourages kids-and parents-to thrive. Indeed, as a self-confessed single mom who "slept with her iPhone," Maushart knew her family's exile from Cyburbia wasn't going to be any easier for her than for her three teenagers, ages fourteen, fifteen, and eighteen. Yet they all soon discovered that the rewards of becoming "unplugged" were more rich and varied than any cyber reality could ever be.

 
  • One family, six months, zero digital devices. Read this true story for inspiration. Read it for laughs. Maybe even read it on your iPad.
    — OPRAH.COM
  • The author narrates her story in a breezy, irreverent style, but beneath the humor is much wisdom about what our wired world does for us and to us... No Luddite diatribe, but an insightful tale of the digital dilemmas familiar to many families.
    — KIRKUS REVIEWS

Consider the Clothesline


Consider the Clothesline